Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī (meaning My Master), 30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273, was a 13th-century Persian[1][8] poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic.

It was his meeting with the dervish Shams-e Tabrizi on 15 November 1244 that completely changed his life. From an accomplished teacher and jurist, Rumi was transformed into an ascetic

He lived most of his life under the Persianate Seljuq Sultanate of Rum, where he produced his works and died in 1273 AD. He was buried in Konya and his shrine became a place of pilgrimage.

Following his death, his followers and his son Sultan Walad founded the Mevlevi Order, also known as the Order of the Whirling Dervishes, famous for its Sufi dance known as the Sama ceremony. He was laid to rest beside his father, and over his remains a splendid shrine was erected.
Rumi died on 17 December 1273 in Konya; his body was interred beside that of his father, and a splendid shrine, today the Mevlâna Museum, was erected over his place of burial. His epitaph reads: When we are dead, seek not our tomb in the earth, but find it in the hearts of men.

The 13th century Mevlâna Mausoleum, with its mosque, dance hall, dervish living quarters, school and tombs of some leaders of the Mevlevi Order, continues to this day to draw pilgrims from all parts of the Muslim and non-Muslim world.